Social Sharing and Comments: If you're on social media, you're probably familiar with sharing and commenting. Social shares and comments are good indicators of how relevant your content is with your target audience. If a viewer watches your video and takes the time to share it with their network, you probably created a great piece of content. Social shares are also important because the more times your video is shared, the more it'll be viewed. If your goal is to reach a lot of people, social shares is a good metric to track.
The YouTube banner is like Facebook’s cover photo, and it will appear across the top of your channel when users visit your channel’s page. Your banner helps you quickly portray what your channel will focus on, and can be a great opportunity for branding. It can help your channel look both more appealing and more professional; both of these will give you instant credibility and can help you increase your subscriber count.
2. Choose your channel icon — Upload a square, high-res (800×800) image that is recognizable and looks great when displayed at smaller resolutions (so use text sparingly). This image will be your channel’s icon throughout all of YouTube. If your channel is linked to G+, you can use an image you’ve previously uploaded to your G+ account. You can access this from your YouTube account page.
For instance, a user with a video with important contact information about a particular product or service may choose to give viewers more time to take down this information. This annotation would appear to be used the least, just by the nature of what it does. However, it’s still useful to highlight an important message or image about your company to consumers, so vital that the video needs a brief pause.
Just as the YouTube Creator Academy preaches getting to the point quickly in channel trailers, Brian Dean of Backlinko asserts the first 15 seconds of your video is the ideal portion to optimize. Why? Because viewers will decide within that first 15 seconds whether your video is the real deal. Once you’ve got their buy-in, your video will naturally accrue greater watch time, improving your ranking signals.
Every single brand has a different commission rate. So Amazon’s will go up to 10% depending on how many products you sell in a month. But some brands will only do 5%, and some will do 50. Some will do 20. So you’ll have to look in the terms and conditions of that advertiser to see what kind of commission they get and whether you want to work with them or not.
As you begin creating videos, you'll notice a key difference between video scripts and your typical business blog post — the language. Video language should be relaxed, clear, and conversational. Avoid using complex sentence structures and eloquent clauses. Instead, connect with your audience by writing in first person and using visual language. Keep the language concise, but avoid jargon and buzzwords.
Asking people to subscribe to your channel is a must-do — and yes, people will actually subscribe just because you ask! But if you give them a reason to, they’re even more likely to hit that red button. “Subscribe so you get my next video first!” or “My subscribers get exclusive content” and “Subscribe so you can enter my giveaway” are examples of language to try.
3. Upload your channel art — Channel art is the banner/header that appears towards the top of your channel when viewed on a desktop. Upload a large image (2560×1440) with the most important visual elements located in the inner 1546×423 area (so they’ll still appear when the image is scaled for mobile and tablet). See the image below for various display dimensions.

To make your videos as memorable as possible, ensure that you’re keeping them in line with your brand strategy. This means keeping colors, fonts, logos and voice the same in your video marketing as they are in your blogs and articles. While videos do things text content doesn’t, users should still be able to recognize the style and format of your brand’s videos online.
Your first opportunity to delight comes directly after the purchase. Consider sending a thank you video to welcome them into the community or an on-boarding video to get them rolling with their new purchase. Then, build out a library of educational courses or product training videos to cater to consumers who prefer self-service or simply want to expand their expertise.
YouTube doesn’t get as much attention from marketers, or on social media news sites, as some of the other platforms do. That’s probably because people aren’t really on YouTube to share content—they come to view it, just like they visit a blog to read a post. The good news for brands is this means when someone arrives on your YouTube channel, they’re ready to hear what you have to say. When approached correctly, marketing on YouTube can provide plenty of ROI.
Here's where the final lesson of composition comes in: continuity. Continuity is the process of combining shots into a sequence so that they appear to have happened at the same time and place. A key part of continuity is making sure any ancillary objects in the scene — for example, a cup of water on a desk — stay in the same place (and have the same amount of water) throughout all of the shots.
In fact, the biggest challenges of video marketing in 2017 are strategic: How to build a solid and effective video marketing strategy, how to create content that people want to consume, and how to create engaging videos that get shared. Additionally, video content marketers need to have a solid understanding of metrics, and how they indicate a video’s success and areas for improvement.

As practice, try telling a story with your b-roll and planning out a shot sequence. For example, your subject might open a door from the hallway, walk into their office space, sit down at their desk, open their laptop, and begin typing. Seems simple, right? But a shot sequence showing this 10-second scenario might consist of six or more different b-roll clips.
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